University of Wisconsin–Madison

Dissemination & Implementation Short Course 2018

A Vision for Health Equity: Applying a Health Equity Lens to Dissemination & Implementation Science

The 2018 D&I Short Course will take place November 1 – 2 in Dejope Hall on the University of Wisconsin-Madison campus. This year’s Short Course will provide a forum for researchers and community stakeholders to explore the emerging field of dissemination and implementation science through the lens of health equity with national and local experts.

The course will include interactive sessions that navigate the steps from concept, design, adaptation, and implementation in practice.

2018 D&I Short Course Agenda (PDF)

Save the Date flyer (PDF)

In addition to UW-Madison faculty, Russ Glasglow and Leopoldo Cabassa, nationally recognized researchers in D&I Science and Health Equity, will be visiting faculty for the course (listed below).

Please bookmark this page and/or sign up for our newsletter for any updates for registration or agenda information.

Register Now for 2018

Free registration is open now!

2018 D&I Short Course Registration

Note: If your plans change after registration, please email kim.kies@wisc.edu, so we can adjust our food and seating plans.

Revisit 2017 Short Course

If you were unable to attend last year’s Short Course or you would like to revisit the sessions/materials.

Click Here for 2017 Short Course materials, including photos, videos, presentation slides, etc.

Details

Leopoldo J. Cabassa, MSW, PhD

Dr. Leopoldo J. Cabassa is an Associate Professor at the Brown School of Social Work and Director of the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)T-32 Training Program at the Center for Mental Health Services Research at Washington University in St. Louis. He received his M.S.W and Ph. D. from Washington University in St. Louis. Prior to joining the faculty at the Brown School, he was a faculty member at the University of Southern California and at Columbia University.  His research blends quantitative and qualitative methods, implementation science, intervention research and community engagement to examine health disparities among racial/ethnic minorities with serious mental illness (SMI; e.g., schizophrenia, bipolar disorder).

His work has been supported by the National Institute of Mental Health, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and the New York State Office of Mental Health.  He is currently leading an R01 from NIMH testing the effectiveness and examining the implementation of a peer-led healthy lifestyle intervention (Peer GLB) in supportive housing agencies serving diverse clients with SMI who are overweight or obese.  Dr. Cabassa’s work is making significant contributions in improving depression literacy and reducing stigma towards mental illness in the Hispanic community, identifying and understanding racial/ethnic health disparities in people with serious mental illness, and examining the adaptation and implementation of health interventions aimed at reducing these health inequities. He teaches graduate level courses in research and evaluation methods, foundations of social work practice, mental health policy, implementation science, and social work with Latino populations. His is a fellow of the New York Academy of Medicine and the Society for Social Work and Research and a standing member of the Health Disparities and Equity Promotion study section of the National Institutes of Health.

Russell E. Glasgow, PhD

Dr. Glasgow focuses on issues of designing for implementation and sustainability, adaptations to programs, pragmatic models and measures, and the development of dissemination plans. Dr. Glasgow is a behavioral scientist who specializes in the development and evaluation of chronic illness prevention and management programs. He is Research Professor at the Department of Family Medicine, School of Medicine at the University of Colorado and Director of the Dissemination and Implementation Program of the Adult and Child Consortium for Health Outcome Research and Delivery Science there.

Dr. Glasgow has 15 years of experience in implementation science and over 25 years of experience in intervention and health outcomes research. He has over 450 peer reviewed publications, most of them related to applied research issues, evaluating and enhancing generalizability of research, pragmatic approaches, and ways to enhance uptake and dissemination. Dr. Glasgow has been PI on over 25 grants from the NIH, AHRQ, CDC and the RWJF. He served as the Deputy Director of Implementation Science at the National Cancer Institute from 2010-2013 and has been a primary developer of the RE-AIM planning and evaluation framework.

Sheri Johnson, PhD

Sheri Johnson, Ph.D. has dedicated her 25+ year career to partnering with children, families, community organizations and systems to advance health and well-being. Awed by the resilience of individuals and communities, she is motivated to remove unfair obstacles and conditions that create and perpetuate health inequities.

Dr. Johnson completed undergraduate studies at Brown University; earned an M.A. and Ph.D. in clinical psychology at Boston University and served as a Clinical Fellow in Psychology at Harvard Medical School. She was previously Director of Behavioral Health at Milwaukee Health Services, Inc., a federally qualified health center and served as the Administrator and State Health Officer for the Wisconsin Division of Public Health. Immediately prior to joining the PHI, she was Associate Professor of Pediatrics at the Medical College of Wisconsin Center for Advancement of Underserved Children where she collaborated with diverse stakeholders to address a broad range of real-world problems.

Jane Mahoney, MD

Dr. Mahoney is Professor in the UW Division of Geriatrics, Director of the Community-Academic Aging Resource Network (CAARN), Director of the Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Institute (WAI), and Associate Director of the Institute for Clinical and Translational Research (ICTR) – Community-Academic Partnerships (CAP) for Implementation Science. She is also an Affiliate Faculty of the UW Institute on Aging.

Dr. Mahoney received her medical degree at the University of California-San Francisco, and completed her medical residency and geriatric fellowship training at the UW. She is nationally recognized for her pioneering research in falls and novel interventions to reduce the incidence of falls in community-dwelling elderly as well as dissemination research on the ‘Stepping On’ falls prevention program which is now in use throughout Wisconsin and many states. Dr. Mahoney’s research has been supported by peer-reviewed grants from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), NIH and AHRQ.

Andrew Quanbeck, PhD

Dr. Quanbeck is an assistant professor in the University of Wisconsin’s Department of Family Medicine and Community Health and an honorary associate of the University of Wisconsin’s Department of Industrial & Systems Engineering. In 2014, he was selected to join the National Academy of Engineering’s Frontiers of Engineering Symposium, which brings together 100 of the nation’s leading engineers between the ages of 30-45 from industry, government, and academia to discuss cutting-edge engineering research.

Dr. Quanbeck’s research draws upon concepts from systems engineering in developing innovative approaches to the implementation of evidence-based practices in healthcare. His research focuses specifically on the prevention and treatment of substance use disorders in primary care settings. He is the principal investigator on two grants from the National Institute on Drug Abuse: one is an R34 clinical trial planning grant aimed at promoting the adoption of clinical guidelines for opioid prescribing in primary care. The other is a mentored research scientist career award focused on the adoption of an evidence-based mobile health technology for substance use treatment in primary care settings. He has authored 25 peer-reviewed papers.

HOTEL:

Best Western Plus InnTowner

The hotel is a 5-minute drive or 13-minute bus ride from the event location.

There are two different ways to book a room at the D&I Short Course special rate of $149.00 plus tax per evening:

Online
Guests should Click Here.  In the ‘Group Code’ field on the left side of the page, please enter 18UWICTR.  A list of available room types will appear and proceed with booking as normal.

Via Phone – InnTowner Direct*
Dial (608) 233-8778 to make a reservation directly with the InnTowner front desk. Guests will, once again, give the group code in order to book, UWICTR18.

* This method is preferred if guests have special requests, such as location of their room within the building, handicap accessible requests, etc.

The last date to book reservations at the D&I Short Course special rate is September 27, 2018.

Walking route from InnTowner to Dejope

PARKING:

Dejope Hall and the closest campus parking ramp with spaces for the public are circled on the attached map.

More information about campus parking and free campus buses

Small group sessions have been a popular component of the UW D&I Short Course from its inception.  D&I faculty will be available to critique your small group session grant proposal, project idea, or scale up innovation project summary. Please register for the Small Group Session by October 19th so we can match your idea as closely as possible with D&I Faculty niche areas to benefit from their feedback and expertise. It works best if you register first for the overall short course.

2018 D&I Short Course Small Group Session Registration

You can participate by submitting a summary of your:

  • Grant proposal;
  • Project idea (development stage); or
  • Evidence-based innovation that you want to scale up (an expert from the UW Discovery to Product program will be present for feedback).

Your abstract will be shared with your small group participants.

Note:  Plan on attending for the whole session.  Part of the benefit of this session comes from both getting and giving feedback to your colleagues. 

2018 D&I Short Course Poster Registration

October 19 deadline.

Poster presentations are encouraged for anyone who has done or is currently engaged in D&I research.  The poster networking session will take place on Thursday, November 1, 2018, from 2:30 to 3:45 pm.  We especially encourage posters that address or would like to address health equity to encourage discussion around the short course topic.  However, all D&I researchers are encouraged to present and engage in this open discussion and networking time.

Your poster title and abstract will be shared with short course participants and cannot be edited after submission.

Note:  Please register for the course before filling out this information so we can make arrangements for your attendance.

Networking

Poster Session

We will, once again, hold a poster session and networking event as part of the Short Course. 

We will invite participants, from across the nation, to showcase their work in Dissemination and Implementation research, activities, tools, processes, and outcomes!

The session will also serve as a great opportunity for Short Course attendees to network with other participants and faculty.

Stay tuned for more details.

View photos from the 2017 Poster Session …

Connections

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